Equal Pay and Compensation Enforcement

Efforts at equal pay enforcement have been aimed at fighting discrimination based on sex and race. Access to data that indicate pay differences and practices is key to effectively fighting pay discrimination in the workplace and enforcing strong measures against it.

However, it’s almost impossible to show existing wage disparities and the most affected parties without substantial data. Lack of such data has made it difficult to enforce equal pay over the years.

Enforcement agencies have access to such data when working on a particular complaint or doing a compliance review but lack access to detailed data on all workers.

Therefore, the agencies responsible for enforcing equal pay and compensation can’t review the data across occupational industries or categories to determine potential areas or trends for scrutiny.

Protections Available against Equal Pay and Compensation Discrimination in the Workplace

Several federal laws offer protection to employees against pay discrimination. They address pay discrimination based on gender or sex. The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has enforced the following laws for protection against wage disparity in the workplace:

The act prohibits wage discrimination based on sex between female and male workers in the same company and doing similar work. It’s against wage discrimination against employees working on jobs that require similar effort, skills, and responsibility under the same working conditions.

The act prohibits discrimination of workers aged 40+ years due to their ages.

  • The 1964 Civil Rights Act, Title VII

This act prohibits employers from implementing unlawful employment practices against their workers. They include discriminating an employee through compensation or pay based on a protected factor such as sex or race.

The act prohibits discriminating against potential employees based on a disability. It covers:

  • Process of job application
  • Hiring
  • Career advancement
  • Employee compensation
  • Discharge
  • Job training
  • Employment terms, conditions and privileges

Compensation here includes:

  • Overtime pay
  • Salary
  • Stock options
  • Bonuses
  • Profit-sharing
  • Life insurance
  • Bonus plans
  • Holiday and vacation pay
  • Hotel accommodation allowances
  • Cleaning or gas allowances
  • Benefits
  • Travel expense reimbursements

 

Remedies for Pay Discrimination Victims

  • Front pay
  • Hiring
  • Back pay
  • Promotion
  • Compensatory damages for suffering and emotional pain
  • Reinstatement
  • Punitive damages to punish the employer
  • Expert witness fees
  • Attorney’s fees

Court costs

However, it’s almost impossible to show existing wage disparities and the most affected parties without substantial data. Lack of such data has made it difficult to enforce equal pay over the years.

Send A Message

Let’s reinforce equal pay laws and workers should be allowed to join unions so that they can fight against pay discrimination. Also, the salaries of women at jobs where they are currently earning lower than the men doing the same things should increase. This approach reduces inequality and encourages fairness for all.

Brief History

Wage Discrimination Today

Women entered paid labor after World War II. Pay discrimination on the basis of sex was rampant then. In 1963, women earned 59% of men’s earnings.

Job ads in the early 1960s were made based on sex. Most positions with high salaries were assigned to men even if the jobs were promoted to both men and women.